Self-Study Courses

High-Strength Bolting

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The purpose of this Course is to provide the participant comprehensive knowledge of high-strength bolted connections. The participant is provided information on bolted joints, bolting materials, the four principal bolt installation methods, and proper inspection. Each of the seven sections stands alone, allowing the participant to study a particular topic in detail without needing to cross-reference other sections. Each of the first six sections contains a 25 question multiple choice quiz to reinforce and test the participant’s understanding, with a 50 question multiple choice capstone quiz for the inspection topic to further reinforce and verify the participant’s knowledge of the subject matter.

 

Upon completion, the participant should be able to properly apply the construction and inspection provisions of the AISC and RCSC Specifications regarding bolted connections, whether as an installer, supervisor, or inspector.

  1. Bolted Joints
  2. Bolting Materials
  3. Turn-of-Nut Method
  4. Twist-Off-Type Tension-Control Bolt Method
  5. Direct Tension Indicator Method
  6. Calibrated Wrench Method
  7. Bolting Inspection

Section 1. Bolted Joints

The purpose of this section is to explain and clarify the code requirements and the proper methods for specifying and using bolted joints. Following completion of this section, the participant should be able to understand the type of bolted joint specified for a specific connection, and to understand the installation and inspection requirements based upon the joint designation.

  1. Joint Types
  2. Shear/Bearing Load Transfer – Snug-Tightened and Pretensioned Joints
  3. Snug-Tightened Joints
  4. Pretensioned Joints
  5. Slip-Critical Joints
  6. Direct Tension Load Transfer
  7. Required Minimum Bolt Pretension – Pretensioned and Slip-Critical Joints
  8. RCSC Specification References
  9. Dimensions and Making of Bolt Holes

Section 2. Bolting Materials

The purpose of this section is to explain and clarify the code requirements and the proper methods for specifying bolts, nuts and washers as fastener assemblies in structural steel connections. Following completion of this section, the participant should be able to properly specify the type of bolting materials required for a project, identify these materials, control the material’s quality upon receipt, and select the proper materials for installation.

  1. Structural Fasteners
  2. Dimensions and Making of Bolt Holes
  3. Jobsite Storage
  4. Lubrication
  5. Requirements for Washers
  6. Bolt Stickout and Approximate Bolt Lengths
  7. Suitable Nuts for Structural Bolts
  8. Bolt Head Markings
  9. Manufacturer and Supplier Marks
  10. Dimensions of Structural Bolts
  11. Nut Markings and Dimensions for Structural Nuts
  12. Dimensions of ASTM F436 Washers
  13. 1Dimensions of ASTM F959 Direct Tension Indicators

Section 3. Turn-of-Nut Method

The purpose of this section is to explain and clarify the code requirements and the proper methods for specifying or performing bolt installation using the turn-of-nut method. Following completion of this section, the participant should be able to properly use high-strength bolts designated for turn-of-nut installation, perform pre-installation testing, snug the joint, install the fastener assembly, pretension the joint, and conduct visual inspection of the completed work.

  1. Pre-Installation Verification Testing Requirements
  2. Pre-Installation Verification – Turn-of-the-Nut Pretensioning Method when bolts are long enough to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  3. Pre-Installation Verification – Turn-of-the-Nut Pretensioning Method when bolts are too short to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  4. Required Minimum Bolt Pretension – Pretensioned and Slip-Critical Joints
  5. Pretensioning – Turn-of-Nut Method
  6. Inspection Procedure
  7. Lubrication
  8. Requirements for Washers
  9. Snug Tight Condition
  10. Systematic Tightening
  11. Bolt Stickout
  12. Reuse of Bolts Previously Pretensioned
  13. Required Rotation for Turn-of-Nut Method

Section 4. Twist-Off-Type Tension-Control Bolt Method

The purpose of this section is to explain and clarify the code requirements and the proper methods for specifying or performing bolt installation using the twist-off-type tension-control bolt method. Following completion of this section, the participant should be able to properly use high-strength bolts designated for twist-off installation, perform pre-installation testing, snug the joint, install the fastener assembly, pretension the joint, and conduct visual inspection of the completed work.

  1. Pre-Installation Verification Testing Requirements
  2. Pre-Installation Verification -Twist-Off-Type Tension-Control Bolt Pretensioning Method when bolts are long enough to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  3. Pre-Installation Verification – Twist-Off-Type Tension-Control Bolt Pretensioning Method when bolts are too short to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  4. Required Minimum Bolt Pretension – Pretensioned and Slip-Critical Joints (kips)
  5. Pretensioning – Twist-Off-Type Tension-Control Bolt Method
  6. Inspection Procedure – Twist-Off-Type Tension-Control Bolt Pretensioning Method
  7. Lubrication
  8. Requirements for Washers
  9. Snug-Tight Condition
  10. Systematic Tightening
  11. Bolt Stickout
  12. Reuse of Bolts Previously Pretensioned
  13. Determining the DTI Calibration for Pre-Installation Verification Tests when bolts are too short to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm

Section 5. Direct Tension Indicator Method

The purpose of this section is to explain and clarify the code requirements and the proper methods for specifying or performing bolt installation using the direct-tension-indicator method. Following completion of this section, the participant should be able to properly use high-strength bolts designated for direct-tension-indicator installation, perform pre-installation testing, snug the joint, install the fastener assembly, pretension the joint, and conduct visual inspection of the completed work.

  1. Pre-Installation Verification Testing Requirements
  2. Pre-Installation Verification – Direct Tension Indicator (DTI) Pretensioning Method when bolts are long enough to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  3. Pre-Installation Verification – Direct Tension Indicator (DTI) Pretensioning Method when bolts are too short to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  4. Required Minimum Bolt Pretension – Pretensioned and Slip-Critical Joints
  5. Pretensioning – Direct Tension Indicator Method
  6. Inspection Procedure – Direct Tension Indicator Method
  7. Lubrication
  8. Requirements for Washers
  9. Snug Tight Condition
  10. Systematic Tightening
  11. Bolt Stickout
  12. Reuse of Bolts Previously Pretensioned

Section 6. Calibrated Wrench Method

The purpose of this section is to explain and clarify the code requirements and the proper methods for performing high-strength bolt installation using the calibrated wrench method. Following completion of this section, the participant should be able to properly use bolts designated for calibrated wrench installation, perform pre-installation calibration and testing, snug the joint, install the fastener assembly, pretension the joint, and conduct visual inspection of the completed work.

  1. Pre-Installation Verification Testing Requirements
  2. Pre-Installation Verification – Calibrated Wrench Pretensioning Method when bolts are long enough to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  3. Pre-Installation Verification – Calibrated Wrench Pretensioning Method when bolts are too short to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm
  4. Required Minimum Bolt Pretension – Pretensioned and Slip-Critical Joints
  5. Pretensioning – Calibrated Wrench Method
  6. Inspection Procedure – Direct Tension Indicator Method
  7. Lubrication
  8. Requirements for Washers
  9. Snug Tight Condition
  10. Systematic Tightening
  11. Bolt Stickout
  12. Reuse of Bolts Previously Pretensioned
  13. Determining the DTI Calibration for Pre-Installation Verification Tests when bolts are too short to fit into the Skidmore-Wilhelm

Section 7. Bolting Inspection

The purpose of this section is to explain and clarify the code requirements for inspection, including the requirements for the individual elements of the bolted connections (holes, bolting materials, faying surfaces), observation of the project operations and the installation methods, and the arbitration of disputes should they arise. Following completion of this section and the prior sections, the participant should be able to properly apply the construction and inspection provisions of the AISC and RCSC Specifications regarding bolted connections, whether as an installer, supervisor, or inspector.

  1. Principles of Bolting Inspection
  2. Bolt Holes
  3. Bolt Head Markings
  4. Bolt Manufacturer and Supplier Marks
  5. Nut Markings
  6. Jobsite Storage
  7. Pre-Installation Verification Testing Requirements
  8. Lubrication
  9. Requirements for Washers
  10. Systematic Tightening
  11. Snug-Tightened Joints
  12. Required Minimum Pretension – Pretensioned and Slip-Critical Joints
  13. Inspection Procedure – Turn-of-Nut Pretensioning Method
  14. Inspection Procedure – Twist-Off Type Tension-Control Bolt Pretensioning Method
  15. Inspection Procedure – Direct Tension Indicator Method
  16. Inspection Procedure – Calibrated Wrench Pretensioning Method
  17. Bolt Stickout
  18. Reuse of Bolts Previously Pretensioned
  19. Arbitration of Disputes – when bolts are long enough to use a Skidmore-Wilhelm
  20. Arbitration of Disputes -when bolts are too short to use a Skidmore-Wilhelm
  21. Determining the DTI Calibration